Ege17ru 3M 39073 Headlight Lens Restoration Kit to Restore Dull/Faded/Discoloured Headlights:Ege17ru
Reply: 10

3M 39073 Headlight Lens Restoration Kit to Restore Dull/Faded/Discoloured Headlights:Ege17ru

3M
1#
3M Published in September 25, 2018, 3:11 pm
 3M 39073 Headlight Lens Restoration Kit to Restore Dull/Faded/Discoloured Headlights:Ege17ru

3M 39073 Headlight Lens Restoration Kit to Restore Dull/Faded/Discoloured Headlights:Ege17ru

Price:£23.99+ Free shipping with 8ballpoolcheats Prime

G Deasy
2#
G Deasy Reply to on 14 October 2017
Well I was looking to clear up my cloudy headlights (had tried toothpaste, which provides a temporary fix) and was looking for a more permanent solution. Had cobtemplated getting new lights on a eBay. Then I thought Id give this a try. I'm delighted I did.
I read the simple instructions twice. It takes a bit of guts to apply sandpaper to your car so I wanted to understand the process first.
Step 1: wash light and put tape around the light (pic 1)
Step 2: use drill and 500 grade sandpaper. (Pic 2) Clean light with damp (not wet) cloth. Headlight will look terrible and you'll start to worry.
Step 3: use drill and 800 grade sandpaper. (Pic 2) Clean light with damp (not wet) cloth. Headlight will still look terrible and you'll still be worried.
Step 4: use bit of water to clear light. Use 3000 gauge pad - light should be damp throughout this process. Now you'll start to see results.
Step 5: put pea sized bit of 3M paste supplied on polishing pad. Spread out on the light WITHOUT USING DRILL. Once spread out on light, use drill to polish and now a some will come across your face! (Pic 4)

I would definitely recommend this product. (So we're clear: I have no connection whatsoever to 3M or the seller or Amazon.)
King Arthur
3#
King Arthur Reply to on 16 October 2017
Finally brought this to try and avoid paying circa £300 for new headlight lenses for my wife's MX5 - Garage said the misted lenses were an MOT failure so I was under pressure to try something drastic. I was nervous about applying sandpaper to an otherwise perfectly good car! - I need not have worried - make sure you take your time and follow the instructions - both headlights now look like new and has lifted the overall look of the car no end. there is plenty of sanding paper and grinding paste to do several cars. I really don't understand why some people have given this product less than 5 stars - particularly when you consider the cost of replacement parts. Make sure you use a handheld / cordless power drill, and not the kind you plug into the mains, otherwise you really will destroy your lenses - also when you use the paste on the final process, make sure the pad does not dry out. Lots of 'gentle pressure' is better than a little 'hard pressure' - do not be tempted to rush things but I did both lights in less than an hour with a cup of tea in the middle ! - good luck!
Stocksy
4#
Stocksy Reply to on 29 April 2017
Used this after trying another product that completely failed to make and difference. It took me about 2 hour's end-to-end and my mains-powered drill was quite hot after all the work. After masking the lights (with tape in the kit) you use the coarsest-grade discs to remove the clouded or yellowed surface I found these discs lost their cutting capacity quite quickly (despite wiping the dust off the lens frequently as instructed) and I was unable to remove all the clouded surface that I wanted with the number of discs in the kit. I squeezed a bit more life out of them by brushing them with a stiff brush to remove the dust that was clogged into them. When I finished all I could with these it was clear that I hadn't got it all and I was still somewhat despondent, expecting a poor result at the end.

Fortunately with the next finest grade discs I wasable to get more of the crud off - I don't think that is the intention - they are meant to start reducing the scratches from the first discs. By the time I was on the third (wet) disc the lenses weren't looking to bad, and the final polishing treatment I was happy that it was good enough - perhaps not quite as good as the before and after pictures on the website suggest, but good enough to easily address any MOT test concerns.

A final observation: if any of the bodywork sticks forward of the headlamp lens, the edge of the disc holder on the drill can easily slide onto it and the masking tape isn't man enough to stop you putting a gouge in the paintwork (as I didin a few places). You probably want to stick on something a bit tougher to protect these bits.
Jason
5#
Jason Reply to on 28 December 2017
The kit itself is nicely packaged and the some of the items are of good quality.

Unfortunately, for me, whilst the kit did remove the yellow hazing that had built up I'm left with lots of micro fine scratches that only really show up properly once the headlights are on. Which really defeats the purpose. It looks great in the day without the lights on, much like in other pictures shared online and on video reviews.

However in many reviews, and videos, it details the process but don't really show the results at night with the lights on.

I've tried the process twice, taken extra care and time on all the steps and it came out no better.

Going to just do it manually
LMD
6#
LMD Reply to on 23 September 2017
I recently had to replace a headlight on a 12yr old car. The first time I drove in the dark I noticed the difference in brightness between the new light that had been fitted and the remaining 12yr old one. I was amazed that weathering of the headlight could reduce light output by so much. This kit was bought to try and restore the old headlight at less than 15% of the cost of fitting a new headlight unit.

I'm very, very pleased to say it did a perfect job and I now have a 12yr old headlight that's just as clear and bright as the brand new one. The instructions on this kit are easy to follow, just fit the sanding pad holder to your drill and follow the steps. Within 20 minutes I'd sanded, smoothed, buffed and polished my headlight and that was it. There's comfortably enough sanding discs and rubbing compound for two headlights although I only needed one.

Honestly, if you've got some old, tired looking headlights and your MoT test is starting to warn you about reduced light output from them, get one of these kits and 45 minutes later they will be pretty much as good as new. I'm just kicking myself that I didn't take a before and after photo!
Mark
7#
Mark Reply to on 3 October 2016
As with many other people I was a little sceptical about taking sanding discs to my headlights, but they were in such a state that it was either that, pay a professional £70-£100 to renovate them, or replace the units (£100's more!) to avoid an MOT failure. After checking reviews and narrowing down the choices to either this kit from 3M or the one from Autoglym (both names and brands I've used before and trust), I decided the edge was with this kit and went ahead with the order, adding the small bottle of UV sealant in order to ensure that whatever finish I ended up with would at least be protected from future sun damage etc. I then waited for a good, dry and fairly sunny day so I would be able to see what I was doing and get all my lights done in one hit, cracked open the kit and got stuck in. I got through three fully charged batteries on my Ryobi cordless drill (set to the lower speed setting 1) and my arms and hands still ached a day later, but the results were just as promised by the blurb on the kit, much to my own surprise and relief. Even my mother-in-law said they looked like new units when I was done about 3 1/2 hours later, so it really does pay to (a) read the instructions and follow them to the letter and (b) take the time to do the job right. My lights went from heavily yellowed and fogged to 'as new', so if the UV sealant I applied (two coats, apply, leave to dry, buff off & repeat) after washing everything down when I was done do their job then I'll be very happy, with clear, bright, safe lights again, a must now that the nights are drawing in for winter.

Some observations: Don't apply too much pressure when sanding - a light drag feeling that doesn't make the drill's note drop seems best, and use a combination of strokes depending on which disc is on the pad. For the early stages with the coarser pad, shorter strokes that repeatedly go over a slowly widening area were best to show the layers of lacquer and fogged plastic coming off, moving onto longer, more even passes across the whole light unit when you switch to the finer sanding discs and the polishing pad. Be thorough and make sure you've really cleared off all the old lacquer so that the headlights really do go a uniform milkiness - that's the scariest part, and the one at which both myself and anyone watching sucked their teeth and shook their heads in doubt, but stick with it as it really does all come good in the end. I have a W211 model E Class and so had four lights to renovate, two 'side' lights and two main headlights - if you have the same model then open the bonnet before you mask up. It means less masking and much easier access to polish/sand the tops of the light units. I did one set with the bonnet closed as I was concerned about how much dust would be made, but it really wasn't anywhere near as bad as I'd feared with the majority falling down in the direction of the drill's rotation so when I moved onto the second pair I opened the bonnet and found the whole process much easier as a result - lesson learned if I ever need to do this again! Also there were enough sanding discs, polish etc. in the kit to do the whole job, so unless you have lights the size of windows you should be fine for pretty much any car I'd think.

In short, if you're having doubts then don't - this kit really does work if you follow the instructions and take your time to be thorough and careful. My lights look amazing now and I keep going out to look at them as I still can't believe how much better they came up - thoroughly recommended kit! Just remember to get the UV sealant as well and apply two coats to make sure your hard work and effort are protected from the sun longer term. I'm going to give my lights another refresher treatment with the sealant every month or so when I clean and polish the car so that hopefully the renovated finish I currently have will last long enough that I won't need to do it again for a number of years.
Pete
8#
Pete Reply to on 11 August 2018
Used on a 2005 Skoda Fabia VRS. Headlights were an MOT advisory last time so needed to get fixed. Worked very well (see attached photo showing before, during and after).

However, if I can share some of my layperson's experience to help others not make my mistakes. Don't go gun-ho like I did with the drill really fast. I ended up with one sanded area the size of the first pad and nothing else as it had worn out almost immediately. Also the drill kept skipping off on to the paintwork (masked, with supplied masking tape in the box, no need to buy extra tape, there is plenty, but DO use several layers!). Everyone will have an opinion about optimum speed but for me it was about the speed of a fast cordless screwdriver and at the lower end of the drill's range. Pads will last enough to cover the whole light at this speed and then some.

A standard drill worked for me - be warned one of the steps involves wetting the headlight with a spray of water and also wetting the pad - I was using an electric drill, so wetted the pad before attaching to the drill and ensured the headlight was damp, not running with water. Take care!

Don't worry that there is only one final polishing pad and one final sanding pad, it's enough for both lights.

Take your time. With all polishing, slower is better. I did each headlight in about an hour but I expect for an experienced person or doing another car, it would be 20 mins if that, as once you have learned what to do, it's easy.

Be very careful when removing each pad after use. Do not just rip them off the velcro. The pad and glue backing (on the velcro pad) get warm and there is a danger of it coming off the attachment if you pull too hard as the force holding the velcro can be a lot, you've problems if this happens. So peel each pad off a little, then push the velcro backing underneath firmly on the drill with your thumb while you peel off the pad slowly with the other hand.

I'm not a car person but managed the whole thing OK. You need a drill, the attachment and pads all included. Tape was included to mask the surrounding paintwork. You just need to supply:, some cloths to wipe the residue off the light as you work (tip: Use a different cloth for the later stages, or you'll be wiping excess course grit over the lights again!), a chair to sit on, a sprayer bottle for the water, a mobile phone to take before and after photos to proudly show off your "new" lights to everyone who is interested (which is no-one, but do it anyway).

I did mine with the bonnet up, as that saved having to mask off that area. It also looked more impressive to anyone walking past, like I was some sort of car buff or something ;)

The polishing compound likes to drip out of the sachet, so open outside. It's all over my doormat!

As others have said, the process involves sanding with finer and finer pads. It will look worse before it looks better. The final stage is amazing, when it all comes up crystal clear.

A five star product for me. Also, for the record, bought with my own money in return for nothing whatsoever. Thank you for reading.
JK
9#
JK Reply to on 26 July 2017
I am amazed how this kit transformed my headlight lenses; the headlights are like new! For under 20 pounds and about 2 hours work I have probably saved a couple of hundred pounds by not having a garage replace both lenses. My car's headlights are as clear as the before/after photos show here. I can highly recommend this product and it is not difficult to use - just follow the instructions.
S G.
10#
S G. Reply to on 20 August 2017
As I was quoted £1560 plus VAT by my local Audi dealer to replace both my front head lights, due to sunlight damage to the front lens, I thought it might be an idea to have a go at restoring them myself before forking out such a massive amounts of money on an old A 8, I found this 3M headlamp restoration kit online, only £21.10p, had to be worth a chance, found a video on U-tube, someone using this kit, a bit out of my comfort zone but worth a go, halfway through thought I had made a big mistake, rubbing down really not my forte, but persevered and much to my amazement it worked, once I had used the last disc and Buffing pad with the paste provided, a miracle occurred, what a saving, I recommend watching the video on U-tube, I would have used a much faster drill without the video, Think that would've been a big mistake, you can't undo what's done, I thoroughly recommend this product, good luck!
Alan H.
11#
Alan H. Reply to on 4 August 2017
Was worried when we started on bmw headlights as replacements cost hundreds of pounds.
We were really careful not to press to hard on the clouded plastic lens covers but it was scary with the coarser grits. Each of the discs is referred to by colour in the instructions so you shouldn't mix them up. The velcro that sticks them to the drill spindle is a great idea.
Took about an hour to do two lights taking lots of time to check the instructions.
The final polish with the paste on the buffing disc brought the surface up like magic.
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